Submit a ticketCall us

WebinarFREE IT Monitoring Webcast

Don’t miss out on our webcast, Essential IT Monitoring with SolarWinds ipMonitor, where we will show you how to keep an eye on your IT environment from one centralized, affordable, and lightweight monitoring tool: SolarWinds® ipMonitor®.

Register now.

Home > Success Center > ipMonitor > ipMonitor - Knowledgebase Articles > Monitor processes on UNIX-based systems using ipMonitor

Monitor processes on UNIX-based systems using ipMonitor

Updated October 3, 2018

Overview

This article describes how to monitor a specific process on a Unix-based system using the ipMonitor Custom SNMP Monitor and the NET-SNMP Daemon. 

Net-SNMP is a suite of applications used to implement SNMP v1, SNMP v2c and SNMP v3 using both Internet Protocol (IP) version 4 and Internet Protocol (IP) version 6. Net-SNMP is available for many Unix and Unix-like operating systems and also for Microsoft Windows. Detailed information on downloading and configuring the Net-SNMP daemon is available from the Net-SNMP website.

Environment

All ipMonitor versions

Details

Before you begin

Before you configure Custom SNMP Monitor to implement the examples outlined in this article, install and configure the Net-SNMP Daemon on each machine you want to monitor.

Add the Proc directive to your snmpd.conf file. The PROC directive increases the indexed OID values. For every entered PROC directive, the OID index value increments by one (1). After you update the configuration file, the Net-SNMP Daemon may need to be restarted.

Directive

PROC [process name]

Examples

PROC sshd
PROC syslogd
PROC httpd

You may need to include the complete path of the monitored process.

See the following resources for details about adding the PROC directive to the configuration file:

Create a custom SNMP monitor

  1. Log in to ipMonitor.
  2. Click the Devices tab and select All Managed Devices.
  3. Select the Device that represents the UNIX server you want to monitor.
  4. Cick Add > Add New Monitor.
  5. In the left pane, click SNMP.
  6. In the right pane, click Custom SNMP.
  7. Assign the monitor a unique name and ensure the address is correct.
  8. For the OID, use one of the OIDs listed in the tables below, depending on what you wish to monitor.
  9. Under Analysis of Test Results.
    1. Set Analyze the test results as Numeric Data.
    2. Set Result is to the desired threshold.
  10. Click OK

Example OIDs

Monitor Name NET-SNMP Daemon :: Number Processes [sshd - Index 1]
Monitor Type Custom SNMP Monitor
SNMP Object Type prCount.1
OID 1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.2.1.5.1
Returns The number of processes currently running of the defined type.
Monitoring Condition Pass if greater than or equal to 1

Monitor failure indicates that no processes of the defined type are currently running.

 

Monitor Name NET-SNMP Daemon :: Number Processes [syslogd - Index 2]
Monitor Type Custom SNMP Monitor
SNMP Object Type prCount.2
OID 1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.2.1.5.2
Returns The number of processes currently running of the defined type.
Monitoring Condition Pass if greater than or equal to 1

Monitor failure indicates that no processes of the defined type are currently running.

 

Monitor Name NET-SNMP Daemon :: Process Status [sshd - Index 1]
Monitor Type Custom SNMP Monitor
SNMP Object Type prErrorFlag.1
OID 1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.2.1.100.1
Returns The process status value.
Monitoring Condition Pass if equal to 0

Monitor failure (returned result = 1) indicates that the process is not functioning as expected.

 

Monitor Name NET-SNMP Daemon :: Process Status [syslogd - Index 2]
Monitor Type Custom SNMP Monitor
SNMP Object Type prErrorFlag.2
OID 1.3.6.1.4.1.2021.2.1.100.2
Returns The process status value.
Monitoring Condition Pass if equal to 0

Monitor failure (returned result = 1) indicates that the process is not functioning as expected.

 

Disclaimer: Please note, any content posted herein is provided as a suggestion or recommendation to you for your internal use. This is not part of the SolarWinds software or documentation that you purchased from SolarWinds, and the information set forth herein may come from third parties. Your organization should internally review and assess to what extent, if any, such custom scripts or recommendations will be incorporated into your environment.  You elect to use third party content at your own risk, and you will be solely responsible for the incorporation of the same, if any.

Last modified

Tags

Classifications

Public